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City of Colorado Springs / Transit Service / News

Steering Committee to Discuss Public Transit Funding/Governance


Structure Alternatives Pros and Cons during Jan. 7 Meeting

 

The next meeting of the Future of Regional Transit  Steering Committee will take place from 1 to 3 p.m., Friday, Jan. 7. The Committee will meet in the Falcon School District 49 Board Room at the Central office, 10850 East Woodmen Rd. (just prior to Meridian Rd.).  Meeting location Mapquest link:  http://mapq.st/h/3-vNx9.  The meeting is open to the public with a public comment and question period included. Please contact Mountain Metropolitan Transit at (719) 385-5974 for ADA accommodations.

During the meeting the Committee will review the potential governance and funding alternatives it has considered for regional transit including:

  • Status quo (public transit remains governed by the City of Colorado Springs City Council)
  • Division of the Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority (PPRTA) with vehicle registration fee
  • Division of PPRTA with legislated sales tax
  • Title 32 district with property tax
  • New RTA with property tax
  • New RTA with legislated sales tax
  • New legislation with sales tax

The Pros and cons of potential phased-in levels of funding/service will be discussed including:

  • Phase 1: Transition from current city council governance to division of PPRTA with additional vehicle registration fee or property millage adequate to restore transit service
  • Phase 2: Based on service results, decide whether  to transition from division of PPRTA to independent district with additional property millage (retaining Phase 1 revenues)
  • Phase 3: Based on Phase 2 results, decide whether to increase the service levels and transit market share with additional property tax

In addition, the Committee will discuss the results of the Dec. 8 region wide, random sample telephone town hall in which more than 400 citizens actively participated.

Voting responses to four questions posed during the telephone town hall include:

  • 84 percent agreed the Pikes Peak region needs an improved public transit system (213 voters).
  • 85 percent agreed that a more stable funding source is needed to assure public transit services are responsible to regional transportation needs (149 voters).
  • In response to the question of how the region should fund transit in addition to the support of farebox and advertising revenues (137 voters):
    • 26 percent indicated a sales tax should fund transit
    • 13 percent indicated a property tax should fund transit
    • 6 percent indicated a payroll tax should fund transit
    • 55 percent indicated it should be funded by ?other? means

 

  • In response to the question of which options citizens would support for a governance structure, (112 voters),
    • 19 percent indicated the City of Colorado Springs ? the current governance model
    • 11 percent indicated a division of the County
    • 36 percent indicated a division of the Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority
    • 34 percent indicated an independent governing board

The full results of the telephone town hall survey as well as the questions and answers posed during the conference are posted on the Future of Regional Transit Web site.

Steering committee members include representatives from each of the municipalities and jurisdictions within the study area, other government agencies, community organizations and citizen groups. The committee will provide its recommendation, which will include a plan to implement the recommendation, to the City of Colorado Springs City Council in March 2011. For more information about the Future of Regional Transit Study, visit the study Web site: www.FutureofRegionalTransit.com.