City of Colorado Springs / Forestry / Colorado Springs & Trees / Arbor Day Trees

Arbor Day 2011: April 29 at America the Beautiful Park

Planting an Austrian Pine
Arbor Day 2011
After the 9:30 a.m. ceremony, volunteers planted 25 trees along the Midland Trail between Monument Creek and Chestnut Street. Volunteers will attach educational tags to trees to share the benefits of the species being given to the community this year:
         Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)  
         Catalpa (Catalpa speciosa)
         English Oak (Quercus robur)
         Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa)
         Box Elder (Acer negundo) from the Select Tree Program
         Austrian Pine (Pinus nigra)
 
Volunteers also painted tree-related mini-murals over 16 graffiti-covered columns along the Midland Trail under I-25 (see slide show below). All paint was reused from the El Paso County Household Hazardous Waste Facility 
 
Special thanks to:
  • Weston Solutions provided $1,500 for the purchase of Arbor Day trees, volunteers, volunteer thank you gifts and promotional assistance.
  • Asplundh provided $500 toward the purchase of Arbor Day trees.
  • Colorado Springs Utilities provided staff support and $2,500 toward the purchase of trees. 
  • City Stormwater staff for their planning and volunteer efforts to clean up trash along this stretch of trail.
  • Waste Connections and Keep Colorado Springs Beautiful (KCSB) provided a tribute tree  to honor the work of the Colorado Springs Police Department's Homeless Outreach Team (HOT).
 
But why plant trees anyway?
  • Trees provide beautiful landscapes, can camouflage unsightly views, and provide privacy.
  • Trees keep our air fresh by supplying the oxygen that we breathe and absorbing the carbon dioxide that we exhale and are emitted by factories and engines. Some trees also trap and filter out dust and pollen on their hairy leaf surfaces.
  • Trees save energy. Trees are natural air conditioners - they lower air temperature by evaporating water in their leaves. Trees can also reduce home heating and cooling costs. Large, broad-leafed shade trees are most effective shading the east and west windows from summer sun while keeping south-facing windows open to the winter sun reduces the need to heat in winter.
  • Trees act as barriers, which cuts down noise pollution and slows down strong winds.
  • Trees stabilize soil and prevent erosion. Trees also absorb stormwater, which keeps pollutants out of our waterways.
  • Trees provide food and shelter us from direct sunlight on hot summer days.


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