Back
line





City of Colorado Springs / Fire / News

Colorado Springs Fire Department Partners with Local Agencies to Provide Child Care Workers with Immunizations for Pertussis (Whooping Cough)
Tuesday, September 25, 2012


Reported cases of pertussis (whooping cough) is on the rise in Colorado. As of September 18, 849 cases of pertussis had been reported across the state. Public Health is urging people, especially those who care for infants and toddlers, to get vaccinated in order to help prevent an outbreak in El Paso County.

The Colorado Springs Fire Departmentrecognizes this community wide problem and we are partnering with many state and local agencies to assist with conducting TDAP (Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis) & Flu Immunization Clinics specifically aimed at licensed and home care child care workers. This is a collaboration with El Paso County Public Health, Peak Vista Community Health Clinics, CSFD and the Pikes Peak Flu & Immunization Coalition. Our goal is to immunize 1000 people by the conclusion of this effort. 

 

What:    TDAP & Flu Immunization Clinics

Who:     Licensed and home care child care workers

Where:  Fire Department Headquarters, 375 Printers Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO

When: 

September 29th
October 6th
November 10th
December 8th

Time:   10:00am - 2:00pm

El Paso County Public Health will provide administrative oversight, training and vaccinations. Peak Vista Community Health Clinics will deploy their mobile care unit and staff to large group meetings where child care workers are gathered to provide immunizations and assist CSFD with the fixed clinics. We believe the fulfillment of this initiative in conjunction with this collaborative approach will prevent illnesses and help protect the most vulnerable citizens among us, our children.

###

More information on the problem of pertussis:

  • In 2012, the largest number of reported pertussis cases was among adults 45 years and older (26 percent) followed by children ages 1-6 (21 percent). Increasing the Tdap (Tetanus, Diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination among adults helps prevent the spread of disease and protects the most vulnerable, particularly young infants. This effort is called “cocooning,” or vaccinating everyone who comes into close contact with an infant. Infants suffer the most severe consequences of whooping cough, including prolonged illness, hospitalization, and death.
  • A substantial number of pertussis cases occur in adults (29 percent of all cases between 2009 and 2011) Adolescents and adults with pertussis may have delayed diagnosis or not seek medical care at all, but are infectious and can spread disease within their homes, workplaces, or schools.
  • In El Paso County, there were 53 cases reported in 2007; 9 cases in 2008; 20 cases in 2009; 21 cases in 2010; 37 cases in 2011 and 34 cases in 2012 (January 1 - September 19).
  • Pertussis is described as a bacterial infection within the respiratory tract that is easily spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The illness begins with sneezing, a runny nose and mild cough, but becomes more severe during the first week or two. The cough may last a couple of months.
  • According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), the vaccine for pertussis is given in combination with vaccines for diphtheria and tetanus. The recommendation for the vaccination is that a total of five doses be given at two, four, six, 15 to 18 months, and between four to six years. Single doses are recommended for children 11 to 12 years of age or for those who have never received the vaccination.
  • According to the CDPHE's study of vaccine preventable diseases in Colorado from 2002-2012, most complete years don't see as many reports of pertussis as there have been just through August of this year. 2004 and 2005 appeared to be particularly hard-hit with 1,185 and 1,383 cases, respectively.